newspaint

Documenting Problems That Were Difficult To Find The Answer To

OpenWRT/LEDE Buffalo WZR-HP-AG300H Getting 5GHz Radio Working

I had a problem with my Buffalo WZR-HP-AG300H, I couldn’t get the 5GHz radio wireless interface working along with the 2.5GHz radio.

In the end I used the following /etc/config/wireless configuration:

config wifi-device 'radio0'
        option type 'mac80211'
        option phy 'phy0'
        option txpower '7'
        option country 'GB'
        option hwmode '11g'
        option channel '7'
        option htmode 'HT20'

config wifi-device 'radio1'
        option type 'mac80211'
        option phy 'phy1'
        option txpower '9'
        option country 'GB'
        option hwmode '11a'
        option channel '120'
        option htmode 'HT40'

config wifi-iface
        option device 'radio0'
        option mode 'ap'
        option ssid 'my2500KHz'
        option network 'wlan'
        option encryption 'psk2'
        option key 'password'
        option wmm '0'

config wifi-iface
        option device 'radio1'
        option mode 'ap'
        option ssid 'my5GHz'
        option network 'wlan'
        option encryption 'psk2'
        option key 'password'
        option wmm '0'

This configuration seemed to work for me only after I rebooted the router.

LXC Container Reports PTY allocation request failed on channel 0 On SSH Connection

I tried upgrading my LXC from Ubuntu Trusty 14.04 by running sudo apt-get install lxc because, by default, the lxc package was not being upgraded.

But I then had problems getting consoles/terminals with my existing LXC containers.

This problem exhibits itself when attempting to ssh to a LXC container with the following message:

# ssh ubuntu@10.0.3.201
ubuntu@10.0.3.201's password: 
PTY allocation request failed on channel 0

It also exhibits itself when attempting to lxc-console a LXC container:

# sudo lxc-console -n mycontainer
lxc-console: commands.c: lxc_cmd_console: 722 Console -1 invalid, busy or all consoles busy.

(although a workaround is to connect using sudo lxc-console -n mycontainer -t 0).

The issue is that every container config file needs to have some extra lines added:

# required for lxc-console to work
lxc.tty = 4

# requires for interactive SSH to work
lxc.pts = 1024

One other issue I came across was that I would get the following errors when trying to start a container:

# sudo lxc-start -F -n mycontainer
Failed to mount cgroup at /sys/fs/cgroup/systemd: Permission denied
[!!!!!!] Failed to mount API filesystems, freezing.
Freezing execution.

This was bypassed by adding the following to the container’s config file:

# disable apparmour restrictions on container
lxc.aa_profile = unconfined

VLC on Ubuntu 16.04 with NVidia Graphics Card – Divx Video Playback Blank

I attempted to play a divx-encoded video on VLC 2.2.2 running on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. The video was blank, although if, while the video was playing, I selected Video > Video Track > Disable, then select Video > Video Track > Track 1 from the menu it would display the current frame as a still image.

I opened up the messages window by selecting Tools > Messages from the menu. I then altered the Verbosity from 0 (errors) to 1 (warnings). Then I pressed play on the video for a short period to capture the warnings:

It displayed messages like:

avi warning: multiple riff -> OpenDML ?
avi warning: detected OpenDML file
avcodec info: Using NVIDIA VDPAU Driver Shared Library 384.59 Wed Jul 19 23:45:51 PDT 2017 for hardware decoding.
avcodec warning: cannot decode one frame (337 bytes)
core warning: VoutDisplayEvent 'pictures invalid'
core warning: VoutDisplayEvent 'pictures invalid'
avcodec warning: cannot decode one frame (337 bytes)
avcodec warning: cannot decode one frame (190 bytes)
avcodec warning: cannot decode one frame (190 bytes)

This led me to thinking the VDPAU driver was maybe failing.

A simple fix (although possibly not efficient) is select Tools > Preferences from the menu, select “Input / Codecs” from the icons at the top of the Simple Preferences dialog box, and change the first option, “Hardware-accelerated decoding” from “Automatic” to “Disable”. Then clicking “Save” at the bottom of the dialog box.

Learning to Drive Non-Synchromesh Heavy Rigid in Melbourne

You want to drive a truck and see that the most broad category of licence you can get in Victoria with a car licence is the Heavy Rigid category (you can’t just jump straight into a Heavy Combination or Multi Combination). Then you realise that you’ll have a condition (B) placed on your licence limiting you to synchromesh/automatic transmissions unless you pass your test in a non-synchromesh vehicle.

Right away you think you’ll do your course/test in a non-synchromesh vehicle. But what does this mean?

For the most part a non-synchromesh truck has what is called a “Roadranger“, “RR”, “Eaton Fuller“, or “crash box” transmission.

They will commonly have 13 or 18 forward gears. Pretty cool, huh? Yeah, well.

First thing my instructor told me was that whatever I thought I knew about driving manual, to forget it. Unfortunately I didn’t forget it. I spent the next two hours crunching gears and feeling like I did the first time, at the age of 16, I tried to shift gears in a car.

So what’s so hard about driving a Roadranger transmission?

The Clutch

The clutch has 4 (four) different positions!

They are:

Position Description
up neutral/driving
quarter down (light push) change gear
third down (heel on floor) vehicle stopped (e.g. at lights)
fully down (for at least 3 seconds) initial gear from neutral
Truck Non-Synchro Clutch Positions

Truck Non-Synchro Clutch Positions

This is pretty much the hardest thing to adapt to. I kept putting my foot to the floor which was wrong, wrong, wrong!

You start off by pushing the clutch “fully down”, counting to three, and then shifting into starting gear (3rd is a popular choice).

Then once moving you put the clutch down a quarter (light push) once the engine hits 1,500 RPM, pull the gear lever out of 3rd, lift the foot off the clutch, wait until the engine drops to 1,200 RPM (about a second), then put the clutch down a quarter (light push) again and slide the gear lever into 4th, lift the foot off the clutch.

That last paragraph is a hell of a lot to take in for an experienced manual vehicle driver. You don’t really need to use the clutch (“floating” gear change) – but you have to use the clutch to pass a driving test.

When you get to a set of traffic lights, once you’ve come to a complete stop, you put the clutch in about a third of the way (heel on the floor), and then change from whatever gear you’re in back into 3rd. Then wait until the lights change when you can pull the clutch out to let the engine bite the wheels and get them moving.

If you ever end up with the gear lever in neutral and come to a complete stop then you’ll have to push the clutch all the way in to the floor and count to 3 (three) before sliding the gear lever into a starting gear (e.g. 3rd).

Gears

Truck Non-Synchro Gear Shift Pattern

Truck Non-Synchro Gear Shift Pattern

That brings us to the easy part, the gears. Or, perhaps, better described by watch the tachometer!

Because you can’t afford to ever think about the gear alone. You get to pick a gear for a given road speed (Km/h) and engine speed (RPM). And there is usually one good choice and one or two poor choices.

Depending on the truck there is a magic range where the engine offers the maximum power – in my truck that was 1,200 – 1,500 RPM.

At the same road speed (in my truck) there is a difference of about 350 RPM between gears.

Upshifting

That means aiming for an engine drop of about 300 RPM when going up a gear (e.g. 5th to 6th) because by the time you’ve finished the shift the engine would have dropped another 50 RPM.

Thus the recommendation when shifting up (e.g. from 5th to 6th) is to take the gear lever out of 5th when the engine hits 1,500 RPM, and put the gear lever back in to 6th when the engine drops to 1,200 RPM.

Downshifting

Aim for an engine rise of about 400 RPM when going down a gear (e.g. 6th to 5th) because by the time you’ve finished the shift the engine would have dropped 50 RPM. This is achieved by revving the engine (it takes practice to do this smoothly without excessively revving) when the clutch is in the neutral (foot off the clutch) position.

Thus the recommendation when shifting down (e.g. from 6th to 5th) is to take the gear lever out of 6th when the engine hits 1,100 RPM, rev the engine up to 1,500 RPM, and put the gear lever back into 5th.

If you’re downshifting 2 (two) gears at once, e.g. when you’re slowing down for a turn from 7th to 5th, then aim for an engine rise of about 700 RPM.

Thus the recommendation when shifting down two gears (e.g. from 7th to 5th) is to take the gear lever out of 7th when the engine hits 800 RPM, rev the engine up to 1,500 RPM, and put the gear lever back into 5th.

Shift Summary

Direction Example RPM Change Out At Then In At
Up 1 gear 5th > 6th -300 1,500 wait one sec 1,200
Down 1 gear 6th > 5th +400 1,100 rev it 1,500
Down 2 gears 7th > 5th +700 800 really rev it 1,500

Like mathematics? You’re going to.

Rescue Points

You’re going to have some tough times. You’ll miss a gear because you got distracted. It might happen during your road test. It happened to me. When this happens you have to have memorised the trifectas mentioned earlier – remember, road speed – engine speed – gear.

This combination is different for every truck so get to know yours. They are called “rescue points”:

Road Speed Engine Speed Gear
20 Km/h 1,100 5th
25 Km/h 1,400 5th
35 Km/h 1,300 6th
45 Km/h 1,200 7th

What does this mean? You’ve forgotten what gear you need to be in. You look at the speedo. You see you’re doing 35 Km/h. So get the engine revs up to 1,300 (with the foot off the clutch pedal), then lightly tap the clutch and put the gear lever into 6th.

This necessarily means looking at the tacho when making gear changes.

13 or 18 Gears?

A 13 gear truck has the following gears:

Rev, Low, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5 1/2, 6, 6 1/2, 7, 7 1/2, 8, 1/2

An 18 gear truck has the following gears:

Rev, Low, Low 1/2, 1, 1 1/2, 2, 2 1/2, 3, 3 1/2, 4, 4 1/2,
5, 5 1/2, 6, 6 1/2, 7, 7 1/2, 8, 8 1/2

Changing into a split gear involves half the rev change of a normal gear change (instead of 350 RPM difference a split gear only changes 175 RPM) and doesn’t involve any clutch use (usually). I’m not going into split gears here because you don’t need them to pass a driving test.

Review

The non-synchromesh transmission is no walk in the park. My instructor described students that were full of bravado going into the course but came out with tears on failing their tests.

You’re going to have to listen to the instructor intently, accept their criticism, accept more of their criticism, and accept even more of their criticism. Because otherwise you’re just not going to get it unless you’re naturally gifted at it.

I enjoyed the challenge – but it was a lot more difficult than I had expected it to be.

USB Tethering From CyanogenMod Android to Ubuntu Trusty 14.04

My laptop could not connect to the hotel’s WiFi but my mobile phone could. So I went into my phone settings, selected “…More”, selected “Tethering & portable hotspot”, and enabled “USB tethering”. This was while my phone was configured to be in “charge only” mode on USB.

My phone was attached to my Ubuntu computer by USB cable. And if I clicked on the Network Manager applet on my start bar (using Xubuntu) it showed me the option of “Ethernet Network (my phone model)” but it was greyed out. So Ubuntu had detected the phone had tethering turned on but wasn’t able to connect to it.

Automatic Option

Click on the Network Manager applet. At the bottom of the menu choose “Edit”.

Press “Add” to add a network connection.

Choose a connection type of “Ethernet” from the drop-down and press the “Create…” button.

Give the connection a name, e.g. “Tethering My Phone USB”. Select your USB interface from the drop down list of “Device MAC address” on the “Ethernet” tab (which is opened by default).

Choose “Save…” and the tethered network should automatically begin to work.

Manual Option (if all else fails)

The solution was to open a terminal and run:

$ sudo ifconfig usb0 up
$ sudo dhclient usb0

Now I had an IP address assigned to my usb0 interface and a default route.

How to Cruise Control a 2017 Renault (Reno)

Can’t quite seem to figure out how to operate the cruise control on a 2017 Renault (Reno) car? Yeah, I couldn’t figure it out, either. The button placement isn’t remotely intuitive.

The switch you want is just below the gear stick.

The rocker switch for cruise control for a Reno is just below the gear stick

The rocker switch for cruise control for a Reno is just below the gear stick

You want to push this button away from the gear stick. This will enable cruise control on the car. If you push the button in the other direction (towards the gear stick) you will turn on “speed limiting” mode. Don’t do this.

Push the button down away from the gear stick into cruise control mode

Push the button down away from the gear stick into cruise control mode

On the dash board, between the two meters, the display should inform you that it is in cruise control mode.

The display will inform you that you are in cruise control mode, and a green cruise control icon will light

The display will inform you that you are in cruise control mode, and a green cruise control icon will light

(Note if that green icon is lit in orange instead then you’ve turned on speed limiting mode by accident. Try rocking the cruise control switch in the other direction.)

Now you can set the cruise control speed by pressing the + button on the steering wheel. You can cancel cruise control by pressing the O button on the steering wheel. You can restore your last set speed by pressing the R button on the steering wheel. Finally, while driving on cruise control, you can use the +/- buttons to increase/decrease your speed slightly.

+ sets the speed, O cancels cruise, R restores the last set speed, and +/- change speed slightly

+ sets the speed, O cancels cruise, R restores the last set speed, and +/- change speed slightly

Prioritising VoIP on OpenWRT/OpenLEDE

Following the advice at the Network Traffic Control (QOS) page on the OpenWRT wiki I installed the tc package:

opkg install tc
opkg install kmod-sched-core

I wanted to set up 4 queues:

  ---[traffic to Australian Phone Company]---
                                             \
  ---[tiny packets <64 bytes]-----------------> router ---[ADSL]--- ISP
                                             /
  ---[small packets <256 bytes]-------------/
                                           /
  ---[everything else]---------------------

I needed a root qdisc with no limitations on it, and a top-level class with a maximum bandwidth of the upload speed to my ISP (around 1,400 kilobits per second).

Beneath this I set up 4 classes with differing priorities and each with a guaranteed minimum bandwidth of 100 kilobits per second each.

#!/bin/sh

DEV=pppoe-adsl
BWMAX=1400kbit

# ensure 32-bit classifier is available
insmod cls_u32
# ensure HTB scheduler is available
insmod sch_htb

echo "Clearing existing root qdisc on $DEV"
tc qdisc del dev $DEV root

echo "Adding root qdisc on $DEV"
tc qdisc add dev $DEV root       handle 1:    htb default 99

echo "Adding top class on $DEV with rate $BWMAX"
tc class add dev $DEV parent 1:  classid 1:1  htb rate $BWMAX ceil $BWMAX burst 6k


# Classes
echo "Creating VoIP class"
tc class add dev $DEV parent 1:1 classid 1:10 htb rate 100kbit ceil $BWMAX burst 6k prio 1

echo "Creating tiny packet class <64 bytes"
tc class add dev $DEV parent 1:1 classid 1:20 htb rate 100kbit ceil $BWMAX burst 6k prio 1

echo "Creating small packet class <256 bytes"
tc class add dev $DEV parent 1:1 classid 1:30 htb rate 100kbit ceil $BWMAX burst 6k prio 3

echo "Creating default class"
tc class add dev $DEV parent 1:1 classid 1:99 htb rate 100kbit ceil $BWMAX burst 6k prio 6


# Filters
echo "Creating VoIP filter to Australian Phone Company only (highest priority traffic)"
tc filter add dev $DEV parent 1: protocol ip prio 2 u32 match ip dst 103.12.10.97/32 flowid 1:10

echo "Creating tiny packet filter <64 bytes (for acknowledgements)"
echo "  allows bottom 6 bits to be anything (2^6 = 64) but all higher bits must be zero"
tc filter add dev $DEV parent 1: protocol ip prio 3 u32 match u16 0x0000 0xffc0 at 2 flowid 1:20

echo "Creating small packet filter <256 bytes (for traffic more likely to be real-time)"
echo "  allows bottom 8 bits to be anything (2^8 = 256) but all higher bits must be zero"
tc filter add dev $DEV parent 1: protocol ip prio 4 u32 match u16 0x0000 0xff00 at 2 flowid 1:30

Viewing the state of the system was straight-forward.

Seeing how many bytes and packets made it through the root qdisc:

# tc -s qdisc show dev $DEV
qdisc htb 1: root refcnt 2 r2q 10 default 99 direct_packets_stat 0 direct_qlen 3
 Sent 20016888 bytes 166952 pkt (dropped 175, overlimits 1496 requeues 0) 
 backlog 0b 0p requeues 0

I could also view the classes to see how many packets had made their way through each one:

# tc -s class show dev $DEV
class htb 1:1 root rate 1400Kbit ceil 1400Kbit burst 6Kb cburst 1599b 
 Sent 20154394 bytes 167785 pkt (dropped 0, overlimits 0 requeues 0) 
 rate 0bit 0pps backlog 0b 0p requeues 0 
 lended: 6096 borrowed: 0 giants: 0
 tokens: 544990 ctokens: 139271

class htb 1:10 parent 1:1 prio 1 rate 100Kbit ceil 1400Kbit burst 6Kb cburst 1599b 
 Sent 218765 bytes 394 pkt (dropped 0, overlimits 0 requeues 0) 
 rate 0bit 0pps backlog 0b 0p requeues 0 
 lended: 394 borrowed: 0 giants: 0
 tokens: 6248750 ctokens: 40610

class htb 1:20 parent 1:1 prio 1 rate 100Kbit ceil 1400Kbit burst 6Kb cburst 1599b 
 Sent 5800369 bytes 112832 pkt (dropped 0, overlimits 0 requeues 0) 
 rate 0bit 0pps backlog 0b 0p requeues 0 
 lended: 109430 borrowed: 3402 giants: 0
 tokens: 7630000 ctokens: 139271

class htb 1:30 parent 1:1 prio 3 rate 100Kbit ceil 1400Kbit burst 6Kb cburst 1599b 
 Sent 4727569 bytes 40204 pkt (dropped 16, overlimits 0 requeues 0) 
 rate 0bit 0pps backlog 0b 0p requeues 0 
 lended: 38041 borrowed: 2163 giants: 0
 tokens: 7586250 ctokens: 136146

class htb 1:99 parent 1:1 prio 6 rate 100Kbit ceil 1400Kbit burst 6Kb cburst 1599b 
 Sent 9407691 bytes 14355 pkt (dropped 159, overlimits 0 requeues 0) 
 rate 0bit 0pps backlog 0b 0p requeues 0 
 lended: 13824 borrowed: 531 giants: 0
 tokens: 6747500 ctokens: 76235

Actually class 1:99 is displayed first.

Aldi WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill and Batteries

Aldi, today (2017-04-22), had for sale the cordless hammer drill titled “WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill”. I spent some time searching the Internet to try and find out the manufacturer but I was unable. As this is the first time I know of that these products have been released to market I am writing this post with pictures of the boxes and products for others.


Battery Pack

Let’s start with the battery pack because without the battery there is no appliance.

The battery is titled “XFinity Plus 20V Battery System XFinity Li-Ion 20V 2.0AH Battery” and the battery purchased had a capacity of 2.0 amp hour (AH). The following is the view of the box from different angles:

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Box Top View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Box Top View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Box Left View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Box Left View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Box Front View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Box Front View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Box Right View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Box Right View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Box Rear View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Box Rear View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery In Plastic Bag

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery In Plastic Bag

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Manual

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Manual

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Top View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Top View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Left View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Left View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Bottom View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion 2.0AH Battery Bottom View


Battery Charger

A battery isn’t much good unless the battery can be charged. So a charger was purchased. The charger is titled “XFinity Plus 20V Battery System XFinity Li-Ion 20V Quick Charger”. The following is the view of the box from different angles:

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger Box Top View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger Box Top View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger Box Left View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger Box Left View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger Box Front View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger Box Front View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger Box Right View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger Box Right View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger Box Rear View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger Box Rear View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger In Plastic Bag

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger In Plastic Bag

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger Manual In Plastic Bag

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger Manual In Plastic Bag

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger Top View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger Top View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger Bottom View

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger Bottom View

When power is applied the green LED is lit.

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger With Green LED Lit

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger With Green LED Lit

When a battery is charging the red LED flashes. When charging is complete the red LED stays lit and does not flash (one must remove the battery when the red LED is steady according to the manual).

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger With Red LED Flashing During Battery Charge

XFinity Plus 20V Li-Ion Quick Charger With Red LED Flashing During Battery Charge


Cordless Hammer Drill

The cordless hammer drill is titled “WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill”.

According to the box the technical specs are:

  • voltage: 20Vd.c.
  • no load speed: 0-380/0-1400/min
  • torque setting: 21
  • maximum torque: 28Nm
  • chuck diameter: 13mm
  • LED worklight: yes

The model is PT160103, version number 0001, product code is 56226, and the date is listed as 04/2017. After sales support line is given to be 1300 777 137 with an e-mail of service@actionspares.com.au.

Contents are listed as:

  • 1 x Hammer drill
  • 1 x Belt hook
  • 1 x Double ended bit
  • 1 x Auxiliary handle
  • 1 x Instruction manual
  • 1 x Warranty certificate

The box states “made in China”.

The following is the view of the box from different angles:

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Box Top View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Box Top View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Box Left View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Box Left View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Box Front View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Box Front View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Box Right View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Box Right View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Box Rear View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Box Rear View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Box Opened

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Box Opened

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Front View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Front View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Right View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Right View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Rear View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Rear View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Bottom View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill Bottom View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill With Battery Pack

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Hammer Drill With Battery Pack

According to the manual there are 3 function types:

  • (icon of drill bit) regular drilling setting for drilling wood, plastic, metal
  • (icon of hammer) hammer drilling setting for hammer drilling masonry
  • (triangular-ish icon) driving setting for tightening or loosening screws

The torque setting is from 1 to 21, 1 being the lowest torque, 21 being the highest.

The speed setting on top of the drill is 1 (slow/low) or 2 (fast/high). High speed has less torque.

The product claims to adhere to technical standards AS/NZS 60745.1, 60745.2.1, and 60745.2.2.

The drill has considerable “whine” – a high pitch tone that changes in pitch depending on how far in the trigger is pulled.

Sadly the first drill I bought failed to observe any of the torque settings (it would drive regardless of how tight it became). I took it back and replaced it with another that now correctly observes the torque setting.

Impact Driver

The impact driver is titled “WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver”.

The technical specifications on the box are:

  • input: 20Vd.c.
  • chuck size: 6.35mm Hex
  • no load speed: 0-2,300/min
  • impact rate: 0-3,200bpm
  • max torque: 140Nm

The following is the view of the box from different angles:

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Box Top View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Box Top View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Box Left View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Box Left View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Box Front View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Box Front View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Box Right View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Box Right View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Box Rear View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Box Rear View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Box Bottom View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Box Bottom View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Box Open View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Box Open View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Front View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Front View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Rear View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Rear View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Right View

WorkZone Titanium+ XFinity Li-Ion 20V Cordless Impact Driver Right View


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ZFS Grub Issues on Boot

I had a problem when attempting to boot into my ZFS root and landed in initramfs rescue prompt.

Using advice from this article:

Command: zpool import -N
Message: cannot import '': no such pool available
Error: 1

Manually import the root pool at the command prompt and then exit.
Hint: Try:  zpool import -f -R / -N


BusyBox v1.22.1 (Ubuntu 1:1.22.0-15ubuntu1) built-in shell (ash)
Enter 'help' for a list of built-in commands.

(initramfs) zpool import -f -R / -N rpool
(initramfs) exit

Begin: Setting mountpoint=/ on ZFS filesystem  ... done
Begin: Mounting ZFS filesystem  ... done
Command: mount -t zfs -o zfsutil  /root
Message: filesystem '' cannot be mounted, unable to open the dataset
mount: mounting  on /root failed: No such file or directory
Error: 1

Manually mount the root filesystem on /root and then exit.


BusyBox v1.22.1 (Ubuntu 1:1.22.0-15ubuntu1) build-in shell (ash)
Enter 'help' for a list of built-in commands

(initramfs)

To fix this issue I ran:

(initramfs) zpool import -R /root rpool
(initramfs) exit

Unfortunately there is a known bug in Ubuntu 16.04.1 grub-probe command which states “error: unknown filesystem” when running update-grub.

The work-around is to update /etc/default/grub and add:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="boot=zfs root=ZFS=rpool/ROOT"

This results in the grub menu specifying the root parameter twice on the kernel boot line in /etc/grub/grub.cfg but the second one takes precedence.

Monitor No Signal on Xubuntu 16.04.1

My Dell server seemed to stop outputting to the monitor on the VGA cable. No signal, the monitor said. It was blank, it was black, it was powered off. I tried unplugging the cable and plugging it back in, no joy.

I tried pressing ctrl-alt-1 to switch to the text console, and the screen came alive, but all I could see was a flashing underline of a cursor in the upper left-hand corner, no login prompt. Same thing for ctrl-alt-2. Tried ctrl-alt-7 to get back to graphics mode and the monitor turned off again.

The following repaired the issue for me without having to reboot, but it did kill my GUI session and all open windows:

sudo /etc/init.d/lightdm restart

My monitor came back alive and I found myself at the GUI XFCE login prompt.